Fact and Opinion Worksheets: Comparing Statements

Children and adults both find it difficult to tell the difference between fact and opinion statements. Some facts can be very hard to believe — and some opinions are very convincing! Prepare your students or challenge yourself with these fact and opinion worksheets.

father and son comparing facts opinions reading newspaper father and son comparing facts opinions reading newspaper
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Fact or Opinion? Worksheet

Telling the difference between facts and opinions is an important media literacy skill. Facts are provable, undeniable facts, while opinions don't require evidence for people to hold them. Confusing the two can lead to incorrect conclusions and baseless claims.

Start with the basics of facts and opinions with this worksheet. Read the following statements and decide whether they are verifiable facts or simply opinions. Once you've finished the sample exercise, you can download the full printable worksheet below.

fact or opinion worksheet

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Fact or Opinion Practice Questions

Read the following statements and decide whether they are verifiable facts or simply opinions.

  1. Lions are mammals.
  2. People shouldn't litter.
  3. Fish make great pets.
  4. Fruits and vegetables are part of a healthy diet.
  5. Texas is the best place to live.
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Answers for Fact or Opinion Practice Questions

How did you do? Check your answers here.

  1. Lions are mammals. (fact)
  2. People shouldn't litter. (opinion)
  3. Fish make great pets. (opinion)
  4. Fruits and vegetables are part of a healthy diet. (fact)
  5. Texas is the best place to live. (opinion)

Change the Facts to Opinions Worksheet

It only takes a few words to change a true fact to a doubtful opinion. Here's a worksheet for students to practice reading a set of facts and changing their wording to make them opinions.

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Changing Facts to Opinions Practice

Read the following facts. Use opinion words (always, never, good, bad, best, worst) to change the wording to opinion statements.

Example:
Fact: Frogs live in rainforest habitats.
Opinion: Frogs are the best animals in rainforest habitats.

  1. The news is on at 6 o'clock.
  2. There is a new Japanese restaurant downtown.
  3. Kelly plays the piano.
  4. Halloween is a holiday.
  5. Alaska is the largest state in the U.S.

Answers for Change the Facts to Opinions Practice

If those were tricky for you, don't worry! Some possible responses include:

  1. The news is never enjoyable to watch.
  2. The new Japanese restaurant is the best restaurant in town.
  3. Kelly is the worst piano player.
  4. Halloween is always fun to celebrate.
  5. Alaska is a good place to live.

Finding Counterarguments for Opinions Worksheet

A good way to tell whether you're reading a fact or opinion is whether the statement can be disproven. After all, you can't argue with facts! Try out this worksheet to test your counterargument skills by forming opposite opinions.

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Finding Counterarguments Practice

Read each opinion. Identify the reason given for each opinion, and see if you can come up with a counterargument for each one.

  1. Sunny days are great because the weather is warm.
  2. Pollution is necessary because companies need to create products.
  3. Fifteen-year-olds should be allowed to vote because they're responsible.
  4. You shouldn't travel on an airplane because it's dangerous.
  5. Cats are the best pets because they're cuddly.

Answers for Finding Counterarguments Practice

See how well you did! Your responses might be different, but as long as they are opposite opinions, you're on the right track.

  1. Sunny days are uncomfortable because it's so hot.
  2. Pollution is unnecessary because it hurts the planet.
  3. Fifteen-year-olds should not be allowed to vote because they have more school to complete.
  4. You should travel on an airplane because there are many safety precautions.
  5. Cats aren't the best pets because they scratch.

Comparing Facts and Opinions Worksheet

You're most likely to encounter facts and opinions in pieces of writing, particularly news articles or editorials. Purely factual articles are more trustworthy than purely opinionated articles. Finish the sample activity and full worksheet to test your ability to compare facts and opinions.

comparing facts and opinions worksheet

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Comparing Facts and Opinions Practice

Read the following passage. Write down which statements are opinions. Then, decide if the passage is trustworthy (0-1 opinion statements), somewhat trustworthy (2-3 opinion statements) or not trustworthy (4-5 opinion statements).

Rats are wonderful pets. They are small enough to carry and keep in a medium-sized cage. Rats can eat most fruits and vegetables as well as their rat food. They like to play with toys and chew cardboard boxes. Everyone should get a rat because they’re the best pet ever!

Answers for Comparing Facts and Opinions

What did you think? If you guessed that it was somewhat trustworthy, you were right! The first and last sentences are opinion statements, but the rest are factual statements about rats as pets.

Fact vs. Opinion: Back It Up

Hopefully, these worksheets can help you tell the difference between fact and opinion statements. Once you know how to write trustworthy, factual articles, your audience will know they can trust you. Learn more about journalism and the importance of being factual with these tips for writing in a newspaper.